Why Pre-Order? But Anyway, Audible Synopsis of R & J The Novel

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Can someone explain what the benefit is to pre-ordering an audio book that is delivered immediately upon purchase, once released?

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26 thoughts on “Why Pre-Order? But Anyway, Audible Synopsis of R & J The Novel

  1. Yeah, it’s not as if a digital, virtual product is going to be sold out on release… I don’t know, if it wasn’t Audible (i.e. part of multi-billion dollar Amazon), I would say it works like a kickstarter campaign, pre-financing the release of a piece of creative art. Or maybe it’s just a way of making sure that people don’t forget to buy this thing.

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    • I don’t think they charge until receipt, but on the other hand, it may make it easier for them to tout “best seller” more quickly. I think Hamlet got there within hours.

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  2. I only pre-order so I don’t forget about it later. It magically turns up in my library without thinking about it. Since December is one of my busiest months, preordering this comes in handy. (I’m an audible subscriber, so I preorder stuff from time to time.)

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    • Take it from me, few in this fandom are going to be able to forget that the book is available on release day. I believe one ardent fan argued with Audible about a prior book – Hamlet I think, that since it was already midnight in Australia, she should be able to download the book simultaneously in the U.S. – and we all learned about it. Does Audible email you that the book is in your library?

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      • yes i thin you get an email and as long as yo go online and use the app ( i listen always on my mobile) it automatically downloads into your library. Though i still checked frantically when the Dickens came out and had to wait for good wifi to download that bulk 😉

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      • Yeah, I get a “Your pre-order is now available” email and a notification in the app.

        I kind of figured that, providing I was paying attention to the fan sites and audible on twitter, I’d hear of it. But Decembers and February/March tend to be my busiest -and most clueless to the outside world- times of the year.

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  3. They don’t charge until you download it. I think it’s just a hype thing that is somehow leftover from a different media past.

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      • I just read a novel on that same topic (US economy goes to hell and what happens next) that I would give a B+: Lionel Shriver’s _The Mandibles_. I’m of mixed feelings on graphic novels and prefer to get them from the library, although I do own a few. Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis is worth buying if you enjoy that kind of thing.

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        • Just finished The Mandibles a week ago. Prospect Park may never seem the same to me -tho to be fair, I was mugged 1/2 a block away from it, in front of my own address.

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          • What did you think? I liked the whole idea and I found myself laughing a lot, but I didn’t appreciate all the economics lessons in the mouths of the different characters. I also ended up thinking that the author doesn’t really understand the point of monetarism — she just put that in the mouth of the Georgetown professor and made him look ridiculous without giving the novel any time to figure out why it’s such a persuasive theory and why we cling to it, even in bad times.

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            • Frankly, I had trouble with the economics, except that theories were repeated so often, they sank in. Some of it was plain gross – but I thought many of the characters were – gems, especially the older generations and the rich sister. But the author took me on a ride, as things got from bad to worse, I felt it with the characters – since it spanned quite a few years. Some of it seemed prescient with what’s happening now (not the sci fi stuff). And for me personally, the locations were familiar. I thought the title/family name was a hoot – had a sort of Vanderbilt sound to it – very posh- while also being sort of absurd and meaningful at the same time (chewing TMJ). Also, the notion of hanging on to things -seemingly worthless possessions to remind one of the past touched me. These are small parts of the story, but having to choose what to take with me when I moved, and looking over my treasure trove when I read the book gave me – G-d help me – the ability to empathize. Oh, and I loved the crazy great aunt. I lke this author’s writing, although there’s usually something about her work that ticks me off – in “Kevin” it was her twist – but I thought it was a wonderful book – though again, very painful. So – maybe B B- for me.

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              • The great aunt was fantastic! (I always think when I read a novel like this that I’d be a minor character who dies in the first chapter.) Willing kind of got on my nerves. The whole question of “what to keep” is a huge issue around here and I thought that was an interesting element of the book. And I thought the older characters were more convincing as well.

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        • Just finished The Mandibles a week ago. Prospect Park may never seem the same to me -tho to be fair, I was mugged 1/2 a block away from it, in front of my own address. I don’t like futuristic/apocalyptic work as a rule, but I like this author – though find her very tough to read -painful. This one had some dark humor in it and I found myself laughing a few times – and gagging.

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    • I’ve gotten stingy with Audible and save my credits for very long books – mostly history or some of their lecture courses. I find I can listen to them over and over and over – sort of as background music.

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      • me too after the DC experience, that was a good credit! LOL I haven’t had the peace for many books since but i am trying to get back to it as it confided stress to the moment i arrived at work, not earlier and took at away sooner if i started listening on my way from work. Macbeth is my next one 🙂

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  4. I pre-order many of my favorite authors. Every so often I’ll remember they should have a book coming out in the next several months, and I’ll check audible to see if it’s available for pre-order. Then a few months later I get a pleasant surprise in my inbox! It would be hard to miss this release since it’s RA-related and I’m about as on-top of RA-related material as I can be, but for most of my regular reading fare it’s not on my day-to-day radar. =)

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