Richard Armitage Birthday Telemarketing

 At least he didn’t ask for £ 666. With all the boosts and blogs and @RCArrmitage tweets, I feel like my twitter feed and WP Reader is a digital version of telemarketing in favor of Cybersmile, from fans and Armitage alike.

Without actually saying this is what he wants for his birthday, between his two tweets ( one referring to last year’s birthday and one suggesting multiples of 4’s as donations, to mark his 44th birthday,) his directions have been made clear

Each of the prior two birthday years since I’ve been a fan, there’ve always been a number of reminders and links to donate to Richard Armitage’s charities or  take some action that will spur some other person to donate on your behalf. It’s one  thing to alert fans to the usual links, but I’m finding the relentless, hysterical fan fundraising appeal for CyberSmile, because that’s what Richard Armitage wants, singularly off-putting.

I’m certain part of this is that I find Cybersmile and his conduct with it, off-putting. The other part is the aforementioned fan response to the Cybersmile appeal, including bragging about their contributions, for the virtual pat on the back that is soon to come from @RCAmitage. Charity ought to be a personal choice and a private act.

From me, Richard Armitage will get a birthday greeting that he will never see, and anything else I choose to do, is between me and the recipients. I am looking forward to a few good fan vids, though.

Advertisements

26 thoughts on “Richard Armitage Birthday Telemarketing

  1. i know, i’ve been feeling quite elated lately and this has somewhat dampened the feeling… well, a bit more than somewhat tbh… And it has the opposite effect on me too sadly. Anyway, i was thinking about the other ones and there are causes closer to my heart. I feel the same about the privacy and lack thereof. But, everyone is free to express appreciation, or not as they see fit and as suits their mood, personality and sentiment 🙂

    Like

    • Can’t argue with that sentiment. And everyone, as you and I are, is free to express their sentiments. I think any good thing anyone does, whether it be giving money to these causes, others, or just, as was suggested, making someone smile, ought to be/would be appreciated by Richard Armitage.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. If Cybersmile isn’t your cup of tea, how about one of the charities on Richard’s Justgiving page or another charity close to your own heart? I’m sure it would still be appreciated. The rule in our house is that the birthday boy/girl can ask for anything they want, but the giver decides what they are willing to give.

    Like

  3. You´re really giving me something to think about here. I am one of those who joined in the giving, followed his suggestion of donating in multiples of 4´s and talked (no bragged!) about it like all the others. Your post quite rightly almost makes me feel ashamed about it though not for the giving itself or for it in favor of the CybersmileFoundation (I think they do their best not just to help raise awareness but also to do something against cyberbullying and so does Richard Armitage although as we all know “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”) but you´re right, the fan fundraising as a whole really has become hysterical and off-putting… Charity should stay a private thing… Thanks for pointing me to it, I appreciate it…

    Like

    • Andrea, it was not my intention to shame you or anyone who has given. I just have a different way of looking at these things.(although based on the comments, I’m not alone) My point was to compare and contrast this particular effort with those of the past and how that affected me, personally. Better you should feel good about yourself for giving, for whatever reason motivated you. You should check out the bloggers’ Spread the Love campaigns. Let me know if you need the link. At the end of joint efforts, money is donated, either through fans or by an anonymous donor for fans’ good deeds.

      Like

  4. I had already thought of his charities, but I can’t afford 44 GBP and to give less but to more than one charity seems overly complicated, I wish he hadn’t said.

    Like

    • His just giving webpage is pretty easy to navigate, and they take donations of every amount, if that’s what you want to, and can do. And there are, as I and others have said in comments, other causes and other ways to honor, celebrate, acknowledge his birthday.

      Like

    • please don’t feel bad about it, one thing i am sure of, he didn’t mean for people to feel obliged or even constrained about it 🙂 It is just good intention and a suggestion to direct our wishes to charities rather than himself, which is where this whole idea originated in the past. Also, from the experience of people i know and myself, every penny counts in a charity 🙂 It doesn’t need to be much (and it really doesn’t need to be a particular one). Multiples of 4 is 8, 12, etc 😉
      One of the ones i sometimes give to sends thank you emails saying what they can do with very little money.. eg buying a pair of socks for somebody homeless, buying lightbulbs, toilet paper – cheap, unglamorous, prosaic things that make al the difference. It is little gestures like this that count as much as big ones.
      And, as Perry said in some cases a smile or a kind word will mean more than all the money in the world!
      I think going back to the basics, to the spirit of things (which i am trying to do myself too) it is about celebrating something that makes us happy by helping make somebody else happy or feel better. He himself doesn’t need millions of boxes of chocolate or thousands of new pairs of socks 😉 so why not direct that feeling to people who need it more? 🙂 So any gesture counts, done in the name of something that was special to us, or not 😉 I strongly believe, beyond any specifics, that when it comes down to it, that is what he means too.

      Like

  5. I’m always torn on this issue…of course, any donation that makes its way to a worthy cause is a good thing. I would never dispute that. I guess my sadness (?) is the relentless jockeying for position that seems to come with this. I give because I give, and the gift’s welcome by the receiver is plenty reward. I’m usually happy to give a nudge to Richard Armitage’s fundraising, but it always leaves a sour taste when charitable contribution seems to turn into a competition for attention from the mount. To me it kind of trivialized and undermines the purpose and the real needs that some of these charities meet.

    Just my two cents. *close sermon*

    Like

  6. I decided to stay off of the Armitage tag on Twitter this week because I knew it would be a combination of smarm and sententiousness and not much fun at all. Luckily we were so busy at work that I wasn’t even tempted. People gotta do what they gotta do, and although i was taught as a child to do charity in secret, as an adult I believe in my heart that an act of kindness done out of any motivation still “counts” in all the ways that are important. So yay for all the good deeds that were done this week — but yeah, it really puts me off the fandom, and to be honest, off Richard Armitage. I was also taught as a child that you are not allowed to ask for gifts or solicit what people should give you (or not give you), but I understand that Armitage is in a different situation — if he didn’t specify this stuff, he’d get heaps of personal / personal-ish gifts that he’s probably not equipped to cope with.

    Like

    • From a practical standpoint, and also a charitable one, I have no issue with him urging fans to choose to donate instead of sending him something, or urging all fans to donate . I think he’s done this before in A Christmas message ( I could be wrong). Every year and all year long, fans initiate, without his urging, charitable drives for his causes, not because he tells us to. This year, I was irritated by how the message was delivered, how he tied it to his birthday, the specific image of Cybersmile, and, then, the fan response. His “directions” and/or, preaching to the fandom, you and I seem to dislike, and I believe one reason is the impact on fandom actions they cause. I think he must have weighed the divisive fan reaction to Cybersmile and decided to go with it anyway – and, I don’t fault him for making that decision – I almost admire it, if he did think about the reaction.
      Very often one can tell that a person is likely to have contributed to some organization just by the T-shirts and tote bags they sport, and not for profit arts organization list patrons and donors all the time. Here, maybe unreasonably, I took the fan publications of their donations on Twitter as their way of saying, “See Richard, I did what you want” and it bugged me. As for asking for or soliciting gifts,yeah, the best case scenario is when someone asks you what you would like – but in his case, I think it was more along the lines of, ” if you’re going to give me a gift, this is what I would like.” It’s on the cusp.

      Like

      • Added to this, I think, is that in the previous-to-Twitter message format, there were usually acknowledgements that fans were already involved in charitable activities on their own, and that time given was an important gift, and so on. The combined focus on “give money” and “behave yourselves on line” is a (for me unattractive) shift.

        re: people gotta do what they gotta do — that applies (I hope!) to Richard Armitage, too.

        Like

  7. This is why there is a way to donate anonymously and to keep the amount of the donation private as well, something I pointed out when I communicated his request. I believe he wanted to avoid getting presents and thought it would be best if people used said money for Cybersmile.

    I do find the ‘competition’ and ‘bragging’ off-putting – intentional or not – but at the same time, not everyone who answered ‘the call’ did it to call attention to themselves. Also, those who used the Just Giving links to promote the page on Twitter, FB, etc., may not have realized the words “I just donated” that were automatically included before the link.

    Richard is navigating the new waters of increased international fame and I do admire his efforts to help. I couldn’t handle that kind of scrutiny, so I appreciate his willingness to put himself out there for charity. The positive outcome of all this is the money that’s being raised, of course. Your post helps us to pause and think about how we sometimes conduct ourselves; that is a very good thing, indeed.

    Thank you for taking the time to bring this up!

    Like

    • Money raised for charity is a good thing. I don’t like some of his charities, but imagine that all of them received some benefit – not just Cybersmile, although some other favorite charities may find their fundraising goals unmet this year, since one of its benefactors is sending business the other other way. Also, I realize now that some of the tweets were almost automatic, once the donations were made – sort of like when a tweet goes out that ” I voted for Richard Armitage for the Jameson Awards.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, I agree. There are people who probably chose to give more or to direct their contributions to another one of the charities he supports. Also, it occurred to me later that some people want to help but they don’t have the disposable income, so they may have chosen to promote his wishes instead. Anyway, I do hope the contributions continue to pour in, especially on this side of the pond, since it’s still early afternoon here. 😉

        Like

          • You should consider suggesting it to him on Twitter if you feel comfortable doing it. Also, for those who don’t have anything against The Salvation Army, they could always make a contribution over here. In lieu of financial donations, some bloggers have decided to volunteer for a cause in the spirit of giving. At least he inspires many people to be generous in their own way. 🙂

            Like

            • I don’t tweet him. I think this is something he must have or ought to have thought about, and either hasn’t found a U.S. or international charity he likes yet, or is not so inclined.

              Like

  8. I was also taught that charitable giving should be done under the radar. But I also agree that when celebrities are inundated with unwanted gifts, turning that into charitable donations is a positive force in the world. I am not crazy about CyberSmile but oh well, his birthday, his choice. My nephew would say CyberSmile addresses a “first world” problem. For him, it could not compete with organizations who are trying to save millions of lives in the developing world. But it does fulfil a need and I do hope there was some charitable overflow to his other groups.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. You are jealous of all the wonderful feelings Richard gets for Cybersmile. And he knows who they are, he will probably never know who you are and has probably never even noticed your opinion. You’re not a bad writer, you should give up this toxic little hobby and get a job.

    Like

    • Your reasoning makes no sense. Why would I be jealous of good feelings Richard Armitage has, if he has them?I don’t need Richard Armitage to know who I am. I don’t need him to read this blog, nor do I write it for him. I don’t know if he knows who I am, most likely not, but I had a chance to tell him, in person, my opinion about at least some things, and I took it. As to getting a job, you don’t know the first thing about me, my work history or anything else ( apparently, you don’t read this blog very often – feel free to keep it that way).

      Like

  10. Pingback: Hilarious: Richard Armitage pro-Cybersmile fan sockpuppet suggests I’m crazy | Me + Richard Armitage

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s