Team Armitage – Part I

Scene from Ultimate Force.Source: RANet.com

Scene from Ultimate Force.Source: RANet.com

A few weeks ago I had a conversation with a very experienced  executive who has made or approved countless hiring decisions at the highest levels of corporate staffing.   Faced with another key hire to make, a decision between two women, he  told me that when selecting a woman for a position on one of his account management or sales teams,  all things being equal, the woman who  had team sports experience over the one who didn’t was going to get the offer.  It had been his experience  that females who have team sports experience, as opposed to ice skaters, skiers, swimmers, fit in better with his mostly all male team members, and  they were easier to get along with, they held the success of the team to be more important than their individual achievement, they followed guidelines and they took criticism better.

He was quick to point out that he filled as many positions in his non-team structured divisions as he did in his team divisions, and for those positions, such as legal, planning, finance, public relations experience in team sports had no influence when deciding between or among female candidates.

There’s no data to back up his thinking. There are some common sense reasons why this thinking is flawed – for example, he doesn’t know  what sort of team member the candidate was. Teams, in my experience, are like all other collective groups in life: there are leaders and followers; selfless and selfish people; not everyone demonstrates good sportsmanship ; some will take the time to help out a weaker player, others will want to cull the herd, or may even denigrate weaker players; some support the coach others criticize the coach. So, my executive could not know which he was going to get when he made his selection.

It made little sense to me, but yet, I found that I had my own preconceived notions about the positives of team sports for youth, none of which are supported by data, or if they are, there are as many studies and expert opinions debunking them.

What does all this have to do with Richard Armitage? It’s relevant because over the course of “getting to know him,” I’ve been observing his athletic abilities – because that’s important to me for reasons I’ll discuss later. It’s connected to earlier discussions on identity and what fans need him to be. I need him to be a good athlete. He might be. I wanted him to be a team athlete. He wasn’t. I wanted him to be a guy who followed sports. I don’t think he is, but the jury is still out.  But, I was able to construct a scenario that sufficiently made him be what I needed him to be.

I make no apology for why the sports thing is important to me at a time when there’s discussion over his politics, his pairings, his drinking, his basic beliefs, as far as we know them. I’ll just say that if he were the star of his school rugby team back then and an asshole now, then sports be damned.

What we know of Richard Armitage’s sports  history is scanty, but I think that’s because there isn’t much to know. When he might have been out playing rounders or soccer, he was probably reading a book or rehearsing his instruments, his steps or his lines.

He says that he took up skiing maybe 7 or 8 years ago and loves it (we don’t know how good he is, but he learns things well).  And he also told us that he goes rock climbing. He can ride a horse – I guess simple riding may qualify as a sport. ( The horse issue “fixed”another “issue” for me – whether he liked animals -because he clearly liked the horse assigned to him for The Hobbit and if that’s the only animal he every likes, it’ll have to do).

What we know about his experience in team sports is (1) that some school friend came out and said that she did not remember him playing rugby at school and (2) in an interview, he stated that when he was auditioning for Ultimate Force he told the casting director that he played some rugby in school, and then had a friend show him some moves before filming. He also said that Ross Kemp, the star of the series, helped everyone out with the rugby scenes. (The idea of a rugby game in Ultimate Force was to instill a concept of team, leadership and competition in Kemp’s Team.)

He might well have “played some rugby in school” if he had to for P.E.; but if he were on a team, I think we would have heard about it.

Richard Armitage and Ross Kemp in Ultimate Force. Source: RANet.com

Richard Armitage and Ross Kemp in Ultimate Force. Source: RANet.com

He has never expressed much of interest as a sports fan. I don’t recall him ever saying that he likes to kick back on weekends and watch sports with or without friends. I think at the BAFTA Tea Party in LA he answered a question about what team he follows- but I wasn’t sure if it was a rugby team or a soccer( football) team. And it didn’t sound convincing to me – but maybe he didn’t hear the question the first time. [ETA: as per Micra, she provided this link supporting this encounter)

So in terms of his actual team sports experience – none or very little. Sports in general, those he engages in came to him later in life. Spectator sports, probably not.

To be continued

Atlantic Monthly had a fascinating article on how hiring decisions were and will be made.

55 thoughts on “Team Armitage – Part I

  1. I understand, and please correct me if I’m wrong, that RA went to Pattinson Dance Academy (now Pattinson College) aged 14 and stayed until he was 17, and at school prior to that he played in the orchestra etc. From my own experience, it would be very unusual for a child to be involved in extra-curricular music activities as well as sports activities such as playing for a team. There wouldn’t usually be the time to do both. Plus, once he reached an age where sports may have played a bigger part he was already specialising in dance. I do believe, however, that he is a relatively keen supporter of Leicester City Football Club (soccer) – I’m sure I’ve read that recently.

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    • I think you’re right that once he went to Pattinson there was no time for Before that, it’s hard to say. When I was in school in the US, before kids got so over scheduled it became ridiculous, and before high school, all my friends played on the basketball team and baseball team AND were also in the school orchestra. I don;t recall him saying he was a “keen” supporter – but I could be wrong.

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      • I wasn’t intending to quote him. Generally, anyone who claims to support their home team when they aren’t known for covering themselves in glory needs a certain amount of keenness 😉 I’m not au fait with the American school system but I’ve always been under the impression that sports and music are hugely important. In British schools this is not so much the case especially in state schools which don’t always have enough money for those things. That’s not to say that there are no sports or music in our schools but when RA (and I) were teenagers, competitive sport was not always viewed favourably in schools here – sad but true.

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        • I didn’t think you were quoting him. I think you were observing what I also thought/think, that he chose something else over sports. My school days were a while back. Things are different now if for no other reason than there are more out of school organized sports than when and where I was growing up. I wish I could say that music was hugely important in American schools. It was when I was growing up, but arts and music is among the first to be cut in budget crunches, while sports get most of the money.

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  2. he also mentioned in the past that he kicks back and watches Rugby on television with his friends.

    I agree that just because someone played team sports doesn’t mean their idea of “team” is universal 😉

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        • There was an article where he mentions watching The Good Life (1975), which was Good Neighbors here in the U.S., and finding it “valid” or “standing up” as a series, even today. (Complete paraphrase – can’t find the article.) At the time he had mentioned it, I had just discovered the show, and quite randomly. I was enamored with the talent, quality of writing and comic timing of the show, but also the solid believability that living this was was/is completely possible if you can commit to it. So also to paraphrase, Richard had also commented on just how the show was relevant still, because of this, now that our culture is finally actively pursuing leaving a smaller carbon footprint on this planet.

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  3. Judging from my little experience on soccer locker rooms working with children I have my doubts about the idea of team. I agree with Perry that you should know what kind of person the candidate was in that team… I saw very bad things, usually brought by far from good parents 😦

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  4. When my sons were in high school, I remember a parent who worked in recruitment telling me exactly what you described- that companies liked to employ people with team sport experience. My sons managed to combine music and sport to a greater or lesser degree for quite a few years, so they’ve got both covered. Let me say, if an employer wants to give them a job based on the perception of either of those types of experience, they won’t be knocking it back!
    You’re right though- playing a team sport in school could be compulsory in some instances, or stipulated by a parent, and a player may well be totally lacking in team spirit and co- operation.
    In any event, RA certainly had the exercise part covered with his dance training, no doubt on a daily basis.

    I wonder whether Richard speaks of climbing mountains as meaning rock climbing with ropes and harnesses, or just rambling up and down hillsides?

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    • The rick climbing, I’d have to look it up but there’s a more precise word for it. abselling, maybe? And it was described in more than one article as an extreme or anyway, risky sport.

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  5. I belong to a drama group and we spend a lot of time doing things that are basically team building or building trust between people, rapport, working together – whatever you like to call it, much more so than whenever I have participated in “team sports”.

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    • That may be true and is probably why corporations and other employers have been conducting team-building exercises, retreats and the like for years. Though I don’t think all group activities or team building exercises provide all the same experiences as sports. I don’t think anything does – good or bad.

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  6. I think the executive’s position is kind of silly or rather he has a picture of team sports that is no longer realized in the U.S.. If you play in an orchestra, work in a volunteer group, participate in a drama group and put on plays, do a community group project in Girl Scouts, plan a dance routine together (or as Armitage did, dance in musicals for years and years), do group projects in school, you work on team work or are supposed to. That mere fact proves nothing (and look at the way basketball teams play today — where everything’s about winning and so the team is set up to highlight the work of the most talented scorer). Then you have the coaches who are all about yelling at the kids, and the parents who scream at the refs. If you want that dynamic in your business, fine. I wouldn’t. Team sports in the US is a very poor model for cooperation at the moment, I would argue.

    That said, there used to be other evidence for his relationship to team sports on the web. I wonder if it’s still there.

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    • As I said in response to Kaprekar’s comment, while I think the executive’s position is baseless, I think team sports has elements none of the other examples do, including competition as a group and highlighting an individual’s achievement. There’s also the element of winning or losing and how one handles that applies to only some of the non sports examples. The other arguments you make all exist and exemplify some of the problems with sports in this country, but as with everything, there are some who do it right and some who don’t. My own experience has shown me that there are coaches, teams, parents who do it all right.

      So far we’ve established, vis a vis his team sports experience, what has been linked in the comments or edited in the post: vague reference to playing rugby in school but needing a friend to show him moves for filming and pick up soccer games with children in S.A. unsubstantiated is the comment I heard 100th hand that a friend said she didn’t remember him playing rugby in school and Kelbel’s recollection that he once said he watches rugby with friends on the weekends – sometimes.

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      • I disagree re sports, but whatever. I don’t think there’s anything you can learn in sports that you can’t learn better elsewhere. I’m not opposed to people doing it, I don’t think it’s wrong, but the negative externalities are severe.

        Kelbel’s comment is accurate. There’s an interview in which he says that his favorite coach potato evening is rugby on the sofa with mates.

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      • I replied with the exact article I read it in earlier, maybe you missed it in the comments. I didn’t link directly b/c it’s from RAnet, but I checked and it is still there, available to read 🙂

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  7. As an aside, I’m glad this exec considers women for jobs, but the exec should also consider the ways that this model is discriminatory because cultural and financial support for women’s athletics in the US is so much less developed. Campuses are constantly figuring out ways to circumvent Title VII.

    For years the Rhodes scholarship application required that applicants prove they’d engaged in team sports. (Maybe it still does, not sure, the university I teach at now doesn’t generate applicants.) This was because the grantor demanded it in his original donation, that being the model of English schoolboy fair play and the sign of virtue and so on. The committees were aware of that, and I imagine they couldn’t change the terms of the grant, but they in turn justified it in terms of quickly fitting in at the English university — as if you couldn’t just as well join a choir or drama group or social club or something else in order to make friends. In practice, that made applications much more difficult for women who were just as qualified in every regard — because there hadn’t been team sports opportunities for them in college, or simply because culturally and socially Americans are much less supportive (to hostile) about team sports.

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    • I think you meant to type Title VI, ( education) not Title VII (employment). Anyway, years ago schools were the way most kids got to play in team sports, (and camp, which would support your position) but today things are very different, at least in this country because of the rise in community team sports like soccer, softball and in cities, basketball and volleyball through little league and so forth. I would argue that these outside venues have given girls much more of an opportunity than schools at the pre-college level. And while this is anecdotal, I think most young women who get to college and want to play sports have already had some experience in that sport. But there is no denying that women’s sports don’t get the financial support as men’s sports at any level. In any event, he didn’t distinguish between college and high school or lower school sports or sports played in any other context. He was comparing, at least in this conversation, those that do individual sports to team sports, and I would have to say that individual sports cost more than team sports outside the school setting. Skating, tennis, skiing, golf, all cost a lot of money.
      And, while I wouldn’t want to be in my client’s shoes and have to show a legitimate, non discriminatory reason for making the selections he did, especially since nothing supports his position except his experience, nothing in the scenario he set up triggers illegal discrimination. In the end, most employment decisions involve some sort of discrimination -preferring one qualification over another.

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      • Sure. Everyone has their reasons for choosing. I just wouldn’t make that my reason, and on basically rational grounds that I observe regularly. Then again, my own experiences with team sports involved being marginalized for lack of skill. I found orchestra, scouting, choir, and volunteering much more affirmative venues both for working in a team toward a goal and learning how to do so successfully. And my impressions of college athletes are neutral to negative. The intramural athletes have better cooperative skills than the scholarship ones, in my impression, but then again most scholarship athletes I’ve taught have had to drop my courses because they require attendance and are too demanding.

        To me, choosing on the basis of athletics is just more old boys’ club. Fine, if that’s what you want, but the world is moving elsewhere and I’m glad.

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  8. Team sports? LOL!! I would never have gotten a job on that basis! And still, I defy anyone telling me I don’t know how to work on a team. I love teams. I form them all the time in work because it is, I believe, the best way to get work done. STOP! Begin Again – Richard Armitage. Who cares really if he likes/participates in/participated in/looks favorably on/could care less about team sports? Do you think that says anything much about him as a person or an actor? Curious.

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    • i wish you had read the post, or read it more closely.I was pretty clear in the first part of my post that *I*cared and I guess you’ll just have to wait for part 2 to see why, if you’re curious. And I’m not going to defend someone else’s position ( the executive) who I didn’t agree with in the first place, but I will point out that he was specific about which jobs he looked at sports team experience for and why – and one of his reasons was that women who had that experience fit in better with the men on his sales teams and account rep teams. And, as someone who managed a lot of people, I can’t agree that teams are always the best way to get work done. It depends on the task at hand.

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      • Waiting to see why! 😀 I AM curious! I mean, I couldn’t be in a more male dominated environment, but my lack of team sports experience has never hindered me. No offense intended! I understand that you are putting the topic forward for discussion.

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  9. As someone who played in music ensembles (band, orchestra) and was part of theater growing up, I would suggest that RA learned to be part of a team through all of these similar experiences. Orchestra/band is similar to a sports team. Everyone has to pull his/her own weight (e.g., know their part, nail their solo lick, etc.) but also much be sensitive to the team (e.g., dynamics, playing together as a section, etc.). This is especially true in a musical/theater production. None of these are solitary sports like swimming, skating, etc. They are team efforts.

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    • Yes, and as far as learning to compete as a team goes — there are all kinds of music competitions for ensembles to participate in and forensics / theater competitions for theater students to participate in, as well.

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    • Welcome Peevish, You may be correct that playing in an orchestra taught Richard Armitage cooperation, though I haven’t gotten to this point yet. In my opinion, having been a member of an orchestra for 6 years in school, and having also played team sports ( but on rotating teams most of the time), I don’t believe that the experiences are the same at all, at least they weren’t for me, in part because of the sheer numbers – our string section having 25, and with the band, the orchestra having about 50 players. I think the fact that in one, players are reading ( and watching the conductor) to determine their moves, and always doing the same thing, compared to a sports team where players are thinking on their feet, reacting to opponents and everyone is doing something different, changes the dynamic of the “team” concept. And in sports, you must be not just sensitive to other players, but you must make way and assist. There are a number of other differences that I see. That isn’t to say that a sports team has more comaraderie than a music group. In sum, I don’t think a “team effort” in every case is the same as a team sport, though there may be closer analogies than an orchestra.

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      • Musicians have to make way and assist. Particularly in improvisational situations like jazz ensembles and in chamber music. Even in orchestra you have to understand where your line fits so you know who you ahve to listen to to support while playing. The other thing is from my perspective you’ve left all the stuff in team sports out about how members of your own team will trip you, aim balls at you, and generally haze you in order to glorify themselves. If that happened in an orchestra, if a musician intentionally played badly to make another one look bad, the person in question would be out immediately. In team sports, those behaviors would be praised. I guess I can see how that might be useful behavior for a salesperson to learn, though.

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        • Improvisational jazz is inapposite. to a discussion about school or youth activities.I think you’re generalizing about the evils you perceive in team sports and how unsportsmanlike conduct might be viewed. Regarding team sports (as well as individual sports such as tennis and skiing) I played sports for years as a girl and a young woman, my nieces and nephews and grand nieces and nephews played and coached sports, the children still play sports, my brothers played sports, my students played sports, I coached sports, I taught sports, my husband and boyfriends played sports and coached sports and I have never heard of or witnessed the kind of behavior you described in any of those situations. Not that it doesn’t exist or hasn’t happened in cases elsewhere. I’ve read about it also, But the goal is exactly the opposite of what you describe. And, for the record, the reason you want a “team player” or why the executive did in his sales and client account divisions was because the success if the team is measured as a whole, and it is sometimes necessary for an individual to actually give up a deal, give it to someone else or sacrifice in some other way for the good of the overall department. Your final sentence ignores this, some of which was mentioned in the post – otherwise, the need for someone who is a team player would not be desired. You’ve fully stated your opinion and leaning here, so I think there is nothing more for you to say.

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          • I’ll limit myself to saying that mprovisational jazz is something kids do in school every day in the U.S. I did it for six years in junior high and high school. My junior and senior years, our group won two competitions after working hard to learn how to cooperate. Over years. Learned a lot of teamwork that way and lots of other stuff, too. I also played summer softball for three years as a young teen. So I also had both experiences. What I learned from summer softball was “keep a stiff upper lip when people harass you and try to hurt you during softball practice” and “cheer for other people even if they yell insults at you when you’re up to bat.” That was the year that Rosenfeldt Insurance won the league championship.

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  10. Never being one for sports, at least playing them, I can understand the thought behind this, but would certainly not appreciate it if I were rejected on this premise. (It makes my skin crawl, actually.) The concept of “team player” is double-edged – it can mean “plays well with others” or is can mean “follows direction without question.” The latter is where it gets tricky. In order to learn how to lead, you must learn how to follow, make mistakes, learn from them, and learn what it takes to guide people. But in the corporate world, this is a manipulation tactic to me, and one I have been victim of and a rebel against. Depending on who you follow and take leadership guidance from means everything – and to me this is important far and above one’s education level – because what kind of leader you become means what kind of social effect you might have on the whole of our culture and on the self-esteem of the individuals that you choose to lead as well.

    Oddly, Ultimate Force is a fine example of bad leadership to me – not so much by Macalwain, but by Kemp’s character (which I’ve deliberately forgotten). The ending of that particular year’s series was a perfect example of leading by bad example – a really bad example. (I still like that you brought it up though.)

    But on Richard as a person, I have never taken whether he was or wasn’t into any team sport into consideration whatsoever. As much as I might enjoy a random game on TV, or attending a Baseball game or two, I have never been one to understand the overwhelming attachment that some may have for sports as a consistent and faithful form of entertainment or participation, outside of occasional good fun and exercise. But, to be fair, some might not understand my overwhelming attachment to a certain British Actor either. 😉

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    • There are probably facets or traits you think Richard Armitage has or you wish he had, that aren’t important to me. That’s where this post is ultimately leading. For example, and I don’t know if this is anything that you care about, but fans have praised him for being frugal. That doesn’t do a thing for me. (If he were downright cheap, it might make a difference to me) but frugality I don’t care about. The concept of “team player” is much broader than what this particular exec was espousing in his preference for women who played team sports vs. individual sports for certain positions. IMO follows direction without question isn’t required of a team player. What is required, of any subordinate in a corporate or other employment position, is to follow direction once the decision has been made. A good leader will/should listen to objections and other ideas – but once the decision is made, and this has nothing to do with teams, then one must follow the direction, or resign – assuming there is nothing illegal or violative of policy in the decision. Of course, Lucas North, John Porter – they can get away with breaching the rules. But in real life, we’re given certain options and procedures to oppose or reject, and if some make a practice of not doing that, then they belong someplace else. Tomorrow morning I won’t be having my usual communications with friends because I’ll be firing a high level executive who didn’t understand that – the first time, the second time – now he will.

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      • I make no assumptions in my comment in regards to Richard and sports. I was certainly not leading toward that in any way, I assure you, Perry.

        In regards to my comments re leadership, people with such responsibilities, and my opinion on how I see that individual executive methods of hiring – they are completely unrelated to Richard. They are my opinions based on your first paragraphs and nothing more.

        My opinion on Ultimate Force and the character of Macalwain and others mentioned still stands.

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  11. One of my sons played rugby all through high school, and I would say the experience bore no relation to that of my other son who was involved in multiple music ensembles.
    Rugby is a game requiring skill, stamina, strength, decision-making under pressure, and good vision. My son soon got to know who would push themselves physically for the good of the team, who would fold under pressure, who would step up when needed, who would pass the ball selflessly to a team mate to score a try. There’s something about the heat of the moment that reveals character traits not evident under other circumstances. As teenagers, they learnt valuable lessons about each other and about themselves.

    My other son was an extremely dedicated musician, and the joy of joint endeavour to produce beautiful music was boundless, but it didn’t have that competitive edge. It’s a group dynamic of a very different kind.

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  12. A novel topic. Thansk!

    I was on my university speech team. Does that count? We would bundle up in cars and drive across country to another university, perform 6 to 8 events three times over two days–often pairing up with two other people for duet acting/interp scenes. Then if we “broke” into finals, we would give another performance for each event. The goal for regular season tournaments was to break into finals to get that needed qualification of each event to go to nationals with them.

    The camaraderie was great! The competition fierce! The sportsmanship de rigeur–don’t squeal when our team won or took second place out of 30 schools, keep calm and carry on. We helped each other, we guided each other, and we loved each other like siblings. Well, there were a few romantic love matches beyond that–went to each others’ 1st and second weddings. Ha!

    And 30 years later we are still friends and pick up right where we left off when we see each other and gatherings, reunions, nationals, and alumni board meetings. The love and respect is still there. And it is amazing to see how everyone “grew up” and became Chairs of their department, a Dean, a VP of a major international hotel chain, moms and dads, aunts and uncles, good friends. We’ve had our losses for those who left us too soon and cleaved together as we said our goodbyes.

    It wasn’t sports, we didn’t wear protective gear. Instead, we wore our hearts on our sleeves as we shared stories and gave original speeches with our performances. Our team uniforms were suits and dressy outfits. Our team song an motto was “We will rock you!” But for endurance and stamina? You try memorizing a prose, poetry, two duets, a persuasion, an informative, a rhet crit, an after dinner speech, and do impromptu–and perform them every weekend from September through April. Then try to get the guy in the lead car to god knows where for the tournament to stop the five car caravan for a potty break. Or as Richard Armitage said when asked about toileting issues: “You are very patient, and then you squeeze.” Ha!

    And oh yeah, one time the coaches booked a really cheap hotel that they were pumped about saving money on–until we got there and they realized it was an “hourly” rate, with towels hanging in the windows as drapes with a faded green initial on it–won’t say which one. And our meal plan was a measley $5 per day, that had to be supplemented from our own pockets.

    But we persevered, enriched our lives, and made great friendships on our speech team.

    Sports is for wimps. Ha!

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  13. Pingback: Richard Armitage Legenda “Boutique” 107: Stuff worth reading | Me + Richard Armitage

  14. With all respect to Perry and my felliow commentators I think you’re missing the point of what the Executive said. It’s not just teamwork that he’s after there, it’s a specific type of teamwork. A woman who has played organized sports in the US likely has had exposure to the dynamic in their male counterparts and THAT is what he’s after. If a woman is familiar with the other team’s playbook, so to speak, then she probably gets how those teams function and speaks the same motivational language without needing it spelled out as “Ed might leer at you but he’s the top widget seller in the district so it’s not that we won’t take you seriously if you complain but we’ll take you more seriously if instead you complain about Steve in the mailroom.” A lot of sports team communication is non-verbal and it’s easier to integrate someone who gets that already. It’s a load of sexist bullpucky.

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    • Having been in sports, drama and music throughout school (it’s Title IX by the way), while each was valuable, it’s what I innately learned from sports that I draw on most often–there is a competitiveness which doesn’t need to be cutthroat, which hones the skills needed in certain businesses, particularly traditionally male-dominated ones. One instance on a field, court, pool, etc. where the opponent underestimates you but you prevail in a sportsmanlike fashion (or you underestimate the opponent and blow it) creates a life lesson which carries over well in many business settings. The key is learning a healthy form of competitiveness, drawing the best from oneself without denegrating your opponent or teammates. There is a confidence level gained in sports, also. For example, girls who participate in sports tend to have a more positive body image, valuing strength and physical ability over conforming with a particular physical look. There are plenty of wonderful things to be gained by other endeavors–I have little problem with public speaking because of my training as a singer–but when I need to be quick on my feet and meet a challenge, it’s what I learned on the basketball court that kicks in.
      As for Richard, I think he is athletic, but not necessarily “into” sports. I doubt he would skip a personal obligation because “the game is on”, but I also think it would be tough talking him out of his run. Personally, I find this an attractive quality in a man.

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    • I think there’s more to it than that Jazz, but I also think you hit an element of the decision making that hasn’t been discussed and that is probably a big part of male exec’s thinking.

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      • I agree there’s more to it but that’s what he can’t legally say. I worked for a guy with that mindset, he was the Office Director and I was the Recruiter/Personnel Supervisor. The city we worked in was very laid back and so was the workforce and as long as we worked together I could never get him to understand that that the sports and war metaphors he thought were motivational were having the opposite effect on our team. Before I became the Recruiter he handled all hiring decisions and he made those decisions “by feeling” rather than rationally.

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        • The down side of favoring sporting types in hiring, besides the obvious fact you miss loads of talent, are those people who were bullies in sports who end up in management. Or the ones who are in mangement and who were always chosen last in a pick up game. Shudder. The key is good sportsmanship and really understanding the “win some, lose some” mentality and knowing that proving yourself takes hard work, team effort, grace and humility.

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